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WFUMB2019 Congress

WFUMB2019 Congress

by Admin

The 17th World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology Congress hosted by
The Australasian Society for Ultrasound in Medicine (ASUM 2019)

5-9 September 2019
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

http://www.wfumb2019.org/

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EUROSON 2019, Granada, Spain

EUROSON 2019, Granada, Spain

by Admin

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) and the Federación Española de Sociedades de Ultrasonidos en Medicina y Biología (FESUMB) are pleased to invite you to Granada in the south of Spain for the 31st European Congress of Ultrasound (EUROSON). The EUROSON 2019 Congress will be held from Wednesday, 29 May, to Saturday, 1 June 2019 at Granada Conference Centre, which is very conveniently located within walking distance from the city centre.

We have a programme, which has been built on the experience of the last years’ FESUMB and its member societies with a combination of invited lectures, scientific communications and workshops, including many opportunities for attendants to get hands-on experience.

Click here for the Conference website

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WFUMB Medical Student Network Group

WFUMB Medical Student Network Group

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Medical Students – Join the Conversation!

The World Federation of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (www.wfumb.org) wants you!

You can now apply to join a specially created Group for Medical Students where you can learn and share with other medical students and educators with a special interest in ultrasound, across the world. We would like to invite you to join the WFUMB Medical Student Network Group where you can share your experiences via discussions, videos, images and posts using the trusted platform of LinkedIn.

In joining the WFUMB Medical Student Network you can help us in building a community where you can encourage others to join and share knowledge to achieve goals.

Click here to apply, answer a few questions about your current student status and we will contact you once we have granted access (having a LinkedIn account before submitting the application will make the process smoother) >>

We look forward to building a Community of Medical Students
within the WFUMB Family

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Presentations from the WFUMB Webinar: IMpocus: The Current State & Exciting Future of Ultrasound Use in Internal Medicine – 08-01-2019
A successful WFUMB Webinar event took place on 8th January 2019, 7 PM CET titled – IMpocus: The Current State & Exciting Future of Ultrasound Use in Internal Medicine on 8th January 2019, 7 PM CET.  Expert speakers from the event were:

Topics were:

• What folks are doing internationally
• How IM POCUS compares with EM or ICU POCUS – what makes us different?
• What challenges we face as a community going forward and how we can address these (as a village)

Presentations from the webinar are below …
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WFUMB Image & video of the Month December 2018

WFUMB Image & video of the Month December 2018

by Admin

Newborn with arterial hypertension and focal renal or adrenal lesion (B-mode ultrasound, 40 mm). Contrast enhanced ultrasound allowed to solve the differential diagnosis. The complete lesion was non-enhancing (contrast injection of Sonovue™, see video). Adrenal hemorrhage is non-enhancing in contrast to adrenal neoplasia.

[Dietrich CF, Buchhorn R]

Take home messages

Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) allows diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage and to exclude neoplasia.
CEUS is safe in newborn, children and adults [(1)].

Featured reference

1.              Sidhu PS, Cantisani V, Deganello A, Dietrich CF, Duran C, Franke D, Harkanyi Z, et al. Role of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) in Paediatric Practice: An EFSUMB Position Statement. Ultraschall Med 2017;38:33-43.

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George Kossoff  – ASUM President 1970-1972,  WFUMB President 1982-1985

How and when did you become involved in ultra-sound?

I graduated from the University of Sydney in March 1959 with a Bachelor degree in Science in Physics and Mathematics and a First Class Honors degree in Electrical Engineering. At that time I considered applying for a position as research scientist in nuclear physics at the Atomic Energy Commission.The day after the results were announced, Norman Murray, the Director of the Common-wealth Acoustic Laboratories, approached me and invited me to set up and head the to be formed Ultrasonics Research Section at the Laboratories. Murray had been keeping an eye on the emerging publications on medical ultrasound. He had attended a meeting of the NHMRC where concern was expressed regarding the use of X-rays in pregnancy and was aware of the first publication by Donald on the use of ultrasound to investigate abdominal masses. He felt that Australia should also begin to undertake research into this emerging field of medical ultrasound and that the Acoustic Laboratories were an appropriate venue for this research.

Norm Murray persuaded me to accept his invitation on the basis of his description of medical ultrasound as a field in the early stages development where it would be easier to make meaningful contributions. As there was no one in Australia with experience in ultra-sound I was to report directly to him as a Section Head. In recognition of this responsibility my appointment would be at a grade higher than that normally offered to a raw graduate. In other words he made me an offer which I just could not refuse and I commenced duties at the Laboratories on 10th of March 1959.

At that time seven groups were undertaking research into medical ultrasound. In the Unit-ed States, Wild and Reid in Minneapolis were investigating imaging the breast, Howry and Holmes in Denver the abdomen, Baum in New York the eye, while Fry and his team in Champaign-Urbana were using high intensity ultrasound to create trackless lesions in the brain. In Europe, Donald in Glasgow was applying ultrasound to examine the pregnant uterus while Edler and Hertz in Malmo were studying the applications of M-mode to image the heart. Finally in Japan, Wagai in Tokyo was the second investigator to begin to image the breast. Our research into obstetrical applications commenced in September 1959 with the appointment of Bill Garrett as clinical consultant to the Section. We were thus the second group internationally to begin research into imaging in obstetrics.

Were there any particular people that influenced your work?

I was very fortunate to have had capable colleagues who wanted to join our Section and to collaborate with all as an interdisciplinary team. There were no walls between researchers working on different projects nor from our medical consultants in different professions. Ideas were exchanged freely in weekly review meetings where our successes, obstacles or failures were presented and discussed. In this way we all contributed to-wards our common objective of advancing our knowledge and contributions to medical ultra-sound.

I would however like however to single out several individuals who made major contributions that influenced my work. Internationally -I was very much impressed by the work of Doug Howry and Joe Holmes who, using the water coupling technique, published detailed images of the human neck and lower limb. This was the main reason as to why our Section, later to become the independent Ultrasonics Institute, chose this approach to examine the pregnant abdomen and the breast. I also closely followed the research conducted by Bill Fry and his team who put together a team of scientists, engineers and medical doctors to produce trackless lesions in the human brain and used this method to study the interconnections between nuclei in the brain of the cat. Australia -I was introduced to various aspects of clinical practice by Bill Garrett in obstetrics and by Tom Reeve in the breast. They were both excellent teachers and with time we developed a team approach to identify the structures in the human body that had not been previously imaged by ultrasound. The imaging of artifacts posed challenges but with time we learned how to identify those and even obtain useful clinical data from their portrayal. In was not uncommon for us to publish technical or clinically oriented papers depending on who was the senior person making the original observation and putting it into practice. Dave Robinson joined the Section eighteen months after my appointment. We had mutual respect for each other abilities and developed a close working relationship. Dave was a practical man and was the person in charge of designing the electronic signal processing and mechanical requirements of our scanners. My contributions lay in the philosophical approaches as to how to handle the complex data acquired by the scanners and in the design and construction of the transducers used in our research.In 1975 we developed the UI Octoson. In this scanner the patient lay essentially on a water bed and was examined from below by eight annular array transducers. Single and com-pound scans were obtained quickly and all the features of the scanner were controlled by a computer. Many radiologists and obstetricians expressed interest in acquiring this equipment.

The Australian Government went to tender to select the company to manufacture this scanner and the Nucleus Group was selected to do so. The Chairman of the Group was Paul Trainor, an Australian enterprenor, who had set up several medical companies including Telectronics and Cochlear. Ausonics Pty Ltd was established to build the UI Octoson and I was asked to help Paul introduce the scanner to the market. This included many meetings with individuals and companies interested in the venture. Paul, a true gentleman, was an excellent negotiator and I learned a lot from him how markets work. The UI Octoson was manufactured in Sydney and over five years nearly two hundred of these scanners were sold world wide.

 

 

George Kossoff, Tom Reeve Jack Jellins (1977)

What were your career highlights?

Here is a chronological list of my career high-lights:
1959 Joined the Commonwealth Acoustic Laboratories and began research into medical ultrasound.
1962 Obtained our first black and white ob-stetrical scans. The outline of the fetal head and trunk were clearly displayed as well as some internal fetal organs such as the spine, the heart and the bladder. This allowed us to make accurate assessment of fetal wellbeing from size measurements, diagnosis of asymmetrical growth retardation and of anomalies that cause bladder obstruction.
1963 Developed techniques to measure the acoustic output of therapeutic and diagnostic transducers. This allowed us to measure the output of different transducer designs and to select those that minimized patient exposure.
1965 With Bill Garrett as senior author published the first detailed paper on our ability to visualize the fetus and the clinical relevance of this information.
1967-1969 Two year sabbatical with Bill Fry. Bill was putting together a scanner which had lesion making as well as imaging capabilities. Bill at that time was President of the AIUM and he appointed me Vice President to help stage the AIUM 1968 Congress. AIUM Congresses had been focused mainly on physio-therapy applications and biological effects. I was interested in incorporating diagnostic imaging as a major component of the 1968 Congress. Unfortunately Bill died suddenly in 1968 and, as stipulated in the AIUM by-laws, I became President for the next year and a half. This Congress marked the transition of the AIUM from a physiotherapy focused organization to one whose major interests are diagnostic applications.
1969 Establishment of ASUM Shortly before my return to AustraIia, I attended the First Congress of WFUMB held in Vienna. On my return I presented a summary of that Congress at an ad hoc meeting of the staff, our medical consultants and other individuals who had an interest in diagnostic ultrasound. At that meeting it was unanimously agreed that a society representing Australian interest should be formed and be named the Australian Society of Ultrasound in Medicine. I had the privilege of being elected Foundation President of the Society and served in that capacity for the next two years. The Society flourished and undertook action not only to promote scientific and clinical applications but also to concentrate on issues of education. One of my greatest satisfactions is to see ASUM flourish to the extent that it has achieved to date, and to see the use of ultrasound in Australia second to none.
1969 Development of Grey Scale Imaging. During the last month of my stay in Illinois, I noted that when medium levels of power out-put were used to image the liver of the cat, the soft tissues reflected echoes of similar size irrespective of the direction of the scanning beam. I realized that the texture of soft tissue reflected the ultrasound energy in a diffuse manner. This was in stark contrast to the specular echoes obtained from large inter-faces with which we were familiar. This led us to redesign transducers and signal processing to display, for the first time, the diffusely reflected echoes -in effect, the first grey scale images.
Jack Jellins and I implemented grey scale imaging late that year on our breast scanner. This scanner was installed at Royal North Shore Hospital, where Tom Reeve was our senior medical consultant on the project. The change in image quality was dramatic. Grey scale imaging allowed us to demonstrate, contrary to the generally held opinion at that time, that most malignancies were hypo rather than hyper echoic as described by Wild and Wagai.
Dave Robinson and I implemented grey scale on our obstetrical scanner early the following year, with Bill Garrett as our medical consultant. For the first time we could visualize the chambers of the fetal heart, identify the fetal umbilical vein in the fetal liver and, as an immediate pay off, visualize with near 100 percent accuracy the placenta. Bill Garrett and I mounted a display of our images at the next WFUMB Congress held in Rotterdam in 1972. The interest in these was dramatic as no one had seen such images previously.
1973 Establishment of ultrasound of the neonatal brain.That year a fetus with ventriculomegaly was observed leading us to determine if we could achieve similar results in the neonate. In consultation with radiologists from Prince of Wales Hospital, ten neonates undergoing air ventriculography were also examined by ultra-sound. Ventricular sizes measured by both methods were in agreement and all further neonatal patients from that hospital were examined by ultrasound only.
1975 Research conducted by the Section differed significantly from that undertaken by the Commonwealth Acoustic Laboratories. Encouraged by our clinical successes and interest in the equipment by clinicians and industry, the Section was formed as an independent Ultrasonics Institute in the Department of Health.
1982 I was elected President of WFUMB for the following three years. The Sydney WFUMB Congress was held in 1985 and attended by over one thousand delegates. The staff of the Institute played a major role in staging this Congress.
1989 The Ultrasonics Institute was transferred to the CSIRO (Commonwealth Industrial and Scientific Organisation) and renamed the Ultrasonic Laboratory.
1997 The Ultrasonic Laboratory was closed signaling the end to uniform ultrasound research in Australia.
1999 I was awarded the AO, an Officer of the Order of Australia.

What are your impressions of the ultrasound technology available today ?

This is a hard question for me to answer, as I have been retired for 15 years. My impression is that ultrasound technology has matured. The equipment is using modern computer technology, the frequency range has been significantly enlarged and a variety of functions have been incorporated in the equipment to facilitate its use in a variety of applications. Ultrasound has been accepted by a range of specialties, and some of the challenges of today relate to the provision of education and training in the correct use of the equipment in professions where the technique forms a small component of the practice.

Challenges and opportunities still abound. I do not know the status of ultrasound contrast agent and this could well be a major application. I am surprised that modern equipment still does not provide quantitative measurement of blood flow. The use of two dimension-al transducers appears to have stalled. The problem of overlying tissue aberration has not been solved. So opportunities exist but how well they will be addressed depends on funding in a climate where interest has shifted to MRI and molecular imaging.

Are you still involved with the ultrasound world ?

I try to follow the ultrasound literature as I am in a fortunate position to receive major journals that feature ultrasound. Until recently I have been involved with the WFUMB Council as member of its Committees on History and on Archives. At the request of Michael Claudon, Barry Goldberg and I put together a paper ” History of Ultrasound and its Presidents”. This paper is published on the WFUMB website in the section on History. Today I am not involved with any ultrasound activity.

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Hiroki Watanabe  – WFUMB  WFUMB President 2000-2003

How and when did you become involved in ultra-sound?

When I just finished the Post-graduate Doctor Course of the Tohoku University, Sendai, in 1965, I was looking for new diagnostic modality for the prostate, because only examination in our hands in those ages was very classical rectal digital palpation, which was introduced in the Greeks’ era.In the early autumn of 1967, I visited a cardiologist in the same University, Dr. Motonao Tanaka, who was a leading researcher of medical engineering. The purpose of visiting was to consult a possibility of my poor idea that some sound from urinary stream in the prostate could be detected, if an electric stethoscope was inserted into the rectal cavity. Occasionally in his laboratory, I found a strange stick. It was a special ultrasonic probe to obtain a section of the heart via the esophagus.

Were there any particular people that influenced your work?

This very new device could not, however, to be used on human subjects, because it caused too much pain to insert into the esophagus. Incidentally and luckily, I became involved in the situation. My poor idea for an intrarectal stethoscope was abandoned at once and we agreed enthusiastically to apply the new device to trying to obtain a prostatic section via the rectum.The very next day, I took a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia to Dr. Tanaka’s laboratory. After much entreating and some threats he was laid on the bed and the probe was inserted into his rectum. The sonogram of the prostate we obtained was fantastic. This was the first section of the prostate in a living body, of which human had ever seen, because it was 10 years before the commercialization of CT and 20 years before that of MRI. The images looked to me as if it was rose colored!

We published this world’s first image modality for the prostate under the name of “transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)” in 1968 but following near 20 years had been spent until its generalization as a routine diagnostic modality. Today, however, we can find the “TRUS machine” in any urologic clinic in the world. In October, 2017, the “50 years Memorial Symposium for TRUS” was organized in the WFUMB 2017 Congress in Taipei.

Were there any particular people that influenced your work?

As mentioned in my previous answer, Dr. Tanaka led me into the ultrasound world. At that time, he had already obtained the world’s first ultrasound tomograms of the moving human heart by means of an originally developed ECG-synchronized pulse-projecting ultrasound technique, 15 years before the appearance of real-time ultrasound. According to this technique, ultrasonograms of each phase of cardiac section were taken by a rotation of the angle of ultrasound beam little by little. Though it took more than an hour to record 20-30 sonograms of all phases, the obtained sections were far much clearer than sonograms by real-time scanner in later years. He is still active in research works even now.

What were your career highlights?

Maybe my career highlight in my memory was the establishment of “WFUMB COE (Center of Excellence)”. I served WFUMB as the President from 2000 to 2003. During this period, a matter of ultrasound education for developing countries was often discussed in the administrative councilors’ meetings. The “Global Steering Group for Education and Training in Diagnostic Imaging” in WHO once planned to establish education centers in Africa as the “African project” but no financial resources were found. Moreover, this plan seemed to me as if developed countries favored developing ones from mercy.

So I proposed my specific plan for the establishment of “WFUMB COE”, based upon a principle that “WFUMB only gives the name and local societies organize each education center for ultrasound by their own effort”. The plan was carried in the WFUMB Administrative Council Meeting in Montreal on May 31, 2003, and the first COE was established in Dhaka, Bangladesh, followed by in Kampala, Uganda, during the next year, 2004. The latter one realized the uncompleted plan of the “African project”. Right now, COE has been established in 13 countries in the world and plays one of the most important roles of WFUMB. I thank many people to support this project and to develop this much. Marv Ziskin, the next President, and Byung Ihn Choi, who led the COE Committee after me, were two key persons for this movement.

What are your impressions of the ultrasound technology available today ?

New technologies appeared in recent years are very much welcome. I think, however, much efforts to refine the image itself should be paid utilizing newly developed functions, because medical ultra-sound is essentially an “image modality”.

Are you still involved with the ultrasound world ?

Yes, I published two very important works with ultrasound during these several years. The first one was concerned with an active opening function of the human urethra, against the conventional physiology that the urethra has only closure function and the opening is due to a passive motion by urine flow. This finding was obtained by transrectal/transvaginal ultrasound (Int J Urol 2014, 21: 208-11).

The second one was concerned with a fact that the human bladder absorbs at least hundreds mL of water from urine during sleep, which is also against the conventional physiology that the bladder is a simple reservoir and absorbs nothing. We performed the periodical measurement of urine volume during sleep by transabdomi-nal 3-D ultrasound and found a definite temporary volume reduction for several times a night (Int J Urol 2016, 23: 182-7). This concept will give a serious impact to the renal physiology and the etiology of various urological diseases.

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WFUMB Image & video of the Month October 2018

WFUMB Image & video of the Month October 2018

by Admin

Pancreatic metastasis from a rectal cancer

Alina Constantin1, Cătălin Copăescu2, Adrian Săftoiu3

  1. Gastroenterology Department, Ponderas Academic Hospital Bucharest
  2. Surgical Department, Ponderas Academic Hospital Bucharest
  3. Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Craiova, Romania

Endoscopic ultrasound elastography (Fig. 1) + Contrast enhanced harmonic EUS (CE-EUS) (Fig. 2, Movie 1) + EUS-fine needle biopsy (FNB) (Fig. 3). Malignant pancreatic tumors are typically stiff hypoenhanced lesions.

For contrast-enhanced EUS, a peripheral rim (visible during microbubble trace imaging mode) with central hypoenhancement in the arterial and venous phase is suggestive of a pancreatic metastasis. In patients with a personal history of a colorectal cancer this indicates the need to use a histological needle biopsy followed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis, performed in order to rule out pancreatic metastasis.

Featured reference

Palazo M., Role of contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in other pancreatic solid lesions: Neuroendocrine tumors, autoimmune pancreatitis and metastases. Endoscopic Ultrasound, 2016, Volume 5, Issue 6 [p. 373-376]

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WFUMB Image & video of the Month September 2018

WFUMB Image & video of the Month September 2018

by Admin

“The 90 % rule”: Conventional ultrasound to detect and exclude choledocholithiasis in biliary pancreatitis.

Conventional B-mode ultrasound allows detection and exclusion of choledocholithiasis in about 90 %.

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WFUMB Image of the Month AUGUST 2018

WFUMB Image of the Month AUGUST 2018

by Admin

Endoscopic ultrasound elastography. Soft small solid pancreatic lesions have a high predictive value to be benign.

In patients with small solid pancreatic lesions, EUS elastography can rule out malignancy with a high level of certainty if the lesion appears soft. A stiff lesion can be either benign or malignant [(1)].

Featured reference

1.         Ignee A, Jenssen C, Arcidiacono PG, Hocke M, Moller K, Saftoiu A, Will U, et al. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography of small solid pancreatic lesions: a multicenter study. Endoscopy 2018.

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WFUMB Image & Video of the Month JULY 2018

WFUMB Image & Video of the Month JULY 2018

by Admin

Contrast enhanced ultrasound. Benign focal liver lesions are typically hyperenhancing in the portal venous phase.

Benign focal liver lesions are typically hyperenhancing in the portal venous and late phases of contrast enhanced ultrasound. Here we demonstrate a typically hyperenhancing hemangioma with peripheral nodular contrast enhancement and next to the hemangioma also a focal nodular hyperplasia with central arterial blood supply (contrast injection of Sonovue™ using the Aixplorer. [(1)].

Featured reference

1.         Dietrich CF, Tana C, Caraiani C, Dong Y. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of solid benign focal liver lesions. Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 2018;12:479-489.

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Mongolia WFUMB COE

Mongolia WFUMB COE

by Admin

ABOUT MONGOLIA ….

Mongolia is a landlocked country bordered by Russia to the north and China to the south, east and west. By the end of 2016, Mongolia has a population of 3,119,900 spread over an area of 1,566 460 sq/km giving a population density of 1.99 per sq/km. 68.9% of the total population live in cities and the remaining 31.1% reside in the rural areas.

The main aims of health services in Mongolia are the provision of accessible, equitable and quality services to everyone.

The priority of Mongolian health sector is to provide primary health care services to citizens. The health system of Mongolia is based on a two-tier model that provides health services at primary and secondary/tertiary levels:

• Primary health care is delivered by family health centres, soum/rural health centers and intersoum hospitals.

• Secondary health care is provided by district and aimag/provincial general hospitals, rural general hospitals.

• Tertiary health care is delivered by multispecialty central hospitals and specialized centers in capital city of Ulaanbaatar.

Patient pathways

Official patient pathway in Mongolia is based on three layer system in order to improve the system efficiency and encourage public health priority. There are some differences between the patient pathways in rural and urban areas due to the structural differences in primary health care provision, which reflects geographical circumstances.

Family health centers (FHCs), provide primary care services for the people who live in the capital city and the aimag/provincial centres, while soum/rural health centers provide a wider range of primary care services to the rural population. The primary care services include outpatient exams, primary diagnostic services, antenatal care, family planning, the prescription of essential drugs, counselling, reassessment check-ups, home visits, palliative care, referrals to district hospitals, and health education and promotion.

A peculiarity of rural PHC in Mongolia is that the soum health centers provide not only outpatient services but also inpatient services for the rural population.

This is mostly because of the geographic and demographic features of Mongolia where the rural population is sparsely distributed over a huge area and they need some inpatient services before travelling long distances to get secondary inpatient care in aimag/provincial hospitals.

The specific challenge of rural primary care is to meet the various health needs of the scattered and distant nomads.

Basic US training for primary health care practitioners

With use of portable ultrasonography machines at the primary health care settings, the need for education and training for primary health care practitioners became important.

During the Congress of WFUMB held in San Paolo in May 2013, Mongolian Society of Diagnostic Ultrasound (MSDU) put in for establishing Center of Education (COE) in Mongolia. WFUMB COE Mongolia established on 25 August 2013 at the Urguu Maternity Hospital No1 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Since that WFUMB COE Mongolia has conducted a training for primary health care practitioners three times a year for 3 months. 320 doctors were trained. Out of them 80 were rural doctors and 240 family doctors.

 

ABOUT COE MONGOLIA

Based at Urguu Maternity Hospital No1 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

COE MONGOLIA TEAM

Director: Enkhbayar Dondog - President of Mongolian Society of Diagnostic Ultrasound - View C.V here
Assistant of Director: Javkhlan Maikhuu

COE Web Site

You can follow this COE by visiting the site http://msdu.mn/en/ or clicking on the title above.

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Kenya WFUMB COE.

Kenya WFUMB COE.

by Admin

The COE is based in the Radiology department of the Aga Khan University hospital in Nairobi Kenya.

Regular educational programs are organized by the COE on a monthly basis. The topics are current and span the entire field of ultrasound examinations. Attendance is good and numbers are increasing.

We hold an annual conference and the last conference was attended by 110 participants; this was full capacity! Attendees came from Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Prof Odd Helge (President, EFSUMB) from Norway was our guest speaker.

Other educational programs include the recently concluded Visiq project. Phillips Medical Systems chose our COE to carry out the research project. Midwives with no previous experience in performing ultrasound were trained for 4 weeks at the COE using a well-structured curriculum that included both classroom teaching and hands on experience. Upon passing an exit examination, they were certified to perform basic obstetric ultrasounds with a view to identify high risk pregnancies. All scans were performed on portable Visiq ultrasound machines in three remote centers. Images and provisional reports were sent to the COE using mobile phone internet technology and validated by Radiologists. The accuracy of performing and reporting scans by midwives, as well as assessing this type of teleradiology was analyzed and the study was completed in 2016; it was recently published in UMB.

In our region, the COE has had a positive impact; here are some reasons:

a) We have improved skills for Sonographers who are practicing but require hands-on experience to perform difficult/challenging ultrasound procedures.

b) The CME lectures are popular and feedback from Sonographers is very positive. However, initially, it was only amenable to those that live in Nairobi. Sonographers from other cities find it difficult to attend. We are distributing the lectures to members of KESUMB.

c) By creating an interest in ultrasound among Radiographers, many are choosing this as their profession. There are now two training centers in Nairobi and large numbers are enrolling for the diploma courses.

Going forward, we are working on an accreditation process because we realized that there are some poorly trained Sonographers in Kenya who have been certified and are licensed to work. This poses serious challenges about patient safety. As a COE, we submitted a proposal to provide accreditation for qualified Sonographers. This will take the form of a test; those that pass will receive accreditation. Those that fail will be offered help (mainly ‘hands on’) to achieve accreditation. This idea has been floated amongst the Sonographer community and the response has been very positive. We are awaiting approval from authorities to start the accreditation process and hope to get this early next year.

ABOUT COE KENYA

The COE is based in the Radiology Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya.

Address: 3rd Parklands Avenue, Nairobi, Kenya

COE KENYA TEAM

The COE Team are led by -
Director: SUDHIR VINAYAK MBChB, M.Med (KENYA) - View C.V here

COE COURSES

Click on the dates and course titles below to view details ...

Sonographers Day

We intend to hold this in February 2019. Local funding will be sought but we may request request $1000.

Accreditation of practicing Sonographers

There are some poorly trained Sonographers in Kenya who have been certified and are licensed to work. This poses serious challenges about patient safety. As a COE, we have written a proposal to provide accreditation for qualified Sonographers. This will take the form of a test; those that pass will receive accreditation. Those that fail will be offered help (mainly ‘hands on’) to achieve accreditation. This idea has been floated amongst the Sonographer community and the response has been very positive.

We are writing a proposal to WFUMB for funding in this regard as a quality assurance exercise so we can improve the skills of Sonographers.

Budget: Three rounds @ $250 per batch of 10. Total: $750

Annual Conference

This will include participation from Sonographers in other cities of Kenya and from some East African countries. This may double as a small MASU meeting. The provisional date is October 2019. Part of the activity will be ‘hands-on’ teaching.

Budget: 2 speakers to be sponsored by WFUM

THEME: Strengthening utility of ultrasound in breast imaging and interventions in LMICs.

VENUE: Aga Khan University Hospital, Lecture theatre.

FULL PROGRAMME HERE >>

COE KENYA REPORTS

All WFUMB COE's are required to provide yearly activity reports:
KENYA 2018 Report - click here >

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Moldova WFUMB COE

Moldova WFUMB COE

by Admin

The WFUMB Center of Education Chisinau is located in the Public Medical and Sanitary Institution “Republican Center of Medical Diagnostics”.

There are 6 examination rooms, equipped with premium and expert ultrasound equipment, as well as computers and printers, where different scans are performed as: abdominal, gynecologic (transvaginal), obstetrics (first trimester), superficial organs as breast and thyroid gland, prostate (transrectal), scrotum, vascular and heart. There is also a meeting room where the courses can be held and a secretariat room. Republican Center of Medical Diagnostics provides also a Conference Hall, available for scientific meetings.

ABOUT COE MOLDOVA

The activity of the WFUMB CoE Chisinau is held within the Public Medical and Sanitary Institution "Republican Center of Medical Diagnostics”
Address: Constantin Virnav str 13, MD-2025, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
tel.: + (373 22) 888347, 725401
fax: + (373 22) 735558
e-mail: crdm@ms.md

COE MOLDOVA TEAM

List of permanent staff of WFUMB Center of Education Chisinau
Director: Dr. Serghei Puiu, MD, PhD - View C.V here
Executive director: Prof. Andrei Testemitanu, MD, PhD
Secretary: Anatol Cretu, MD
Members: Prof. Vasile Turcanu, MD, PhD Lilana Fuior-Bulhac, MD, PhD Ecaterina Puskina, MD

COE COURSES

Click on the dates and course titles below to view details ...

  • 14-15 June, GIUS for residents. Hands-on for gastroenterologists and gastroenterology residents
  • 25-26 October, GYN ultrasound workshop for sonographers, gynecologists and radiologists
  • As well as other up to 4 (?) hands-on training for students and radiology residents in obstetric and gynecology ultrasound (under discussion with Students Assosiation of the SUMPh «Nicolae Testemitanu»).

Basic Ultrasound Training Course in First Trimester of Pregnancy

Saturday, 08.00-14.00

Topics:

08.00 – 08.30 Basic physics of the ultrasound. Technical aspects and types of ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound applications in various fields.

Basic functionality of the machine. Basic settings of the US machine. Image optimization.

Limitations and common artifacts. The biologic effects of ultrasound on human tissue and safety issues.

  • – 09.30 Dating ultrasound, estimation of gestational age. Ultrasound features of normal early pregnancy (up to 11sa). Sonoembriology.

Assessment of embryo anatomy according to gestational age. Biometry and embryo vitality.

Twin pregnancy, chorionicity and zygosity determination.

Ultrasound features of the most common pathologies of the first trimester of pregnancy.

 

  • – 10.30 Basic knowledge of ultrasound screening of fetal chromosomal anomalies

(11- 13+6 weeks of gestation). Ultrasound markers of chromosomal pathologies.

Assessment of fetal anatomy according to gestational age. Fetal biometry.

Normal and abnormal appearances of the fetal anatomy. Common structural fetal abnormalities of the first trimester of gestation.

Ultrasound assessment of the placenta, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and cervix. Key ultrasound features of common pathologies.

  • – 14.00 Hands-on. Ultrasound scanning in first trimesters. Aims: the trainee must be

able to:

  • Correct confirm the presence of the pregnancy;
  • Confirm the viability and determine the number of viable embryo/fetuses;
  • If twin pregnancy, accurately determine the chorionicity and amnionicity;
  • Establish accurately the gestational age;
  • Assess the gross embryo / fetal anatomy according to gestational age;
  • Ultrasound assessment of the placenta, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and cervix.

Lecturers:  

Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Liliana Fuior, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Attendance: 

18 participants, students (sixth year) and gynecology residents of the State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemitanu”

 

Basic training course in gynecological ultrasonography.

Saturday, 08.00-13.00

Topics:

  1. Basic physics of the ultrasound. Limitations and common artifacts. The effects of ultrasound on human tissue and safety issues.
  2. Technical aspects and types of ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound applications in various fields.
  3. Basic functionality and settings of the US machine. Image optimization.
  4. Image recognition of normal female pelvis anatomy.
  5. US assessment of the menstrual cycle (uterine and ovarian).
  6. Image recognition of common gynecological pathologies.
  7. Hands-on. Ultrasound examination of the female pelvis (abdominal/transvaginal approaches).

Lecturers:  

Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Liliana Fuior, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Attendance: 

22 participants, students (VI year), OBGYN and radiology residents of the State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemitanu”

Basic Ultrasound Training Course in Obstetrics (second/third trimester)

Saturday, 08.00-14.00

Topics:

  1. Basic physics of the ultrasound. Technical aspects and types of ultrasound examinations.
  2. Basic functionality of the machine. Basic settings of the US machine. Image optimization. Limitations and common artifacts.
  3. The effects of ultrasound on human tissue and safety issues.
  4. Practice guidelines (ISUOG, AIUM) of the routine mid-trimester fetal ultrasound scan.
  5. Fetal biometry – dating, assessing size and estimating fetal weight.
  6. Assessing the fetal growth. Basic knowledge of the fetal growth restriction. Basic Doppler knowledge.
  7. Normal and abnormal appearances of the fetal anatomy. Ultrasound features of common structural fetal abnormalities.
  8. Twin pregnancy. Normal and abnormal appearances.
  9. Ultrasound assessment of the placenta, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and cervix. Key ultrasound features of common pathologies.
  10. Hands-on. Ultrasound scanning in II and III trimesters.

Lecturers:  

Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau

Attendance: 

12 participants, students (sixth year) and radiology residents of the State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemitanu”

Basic Ultrasound Training Course in Obstetrics

Topics:

  1. Basic physics of the ultrasound. Technical aspects and types of ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound applications in various fields.
  2. Basic functionality of the machine. Basic settings of the US machine. Image optimization. Limitations and common artifacts.
  3. The effects of ultrasound on human tissue and safety issues.
  4. Dating ultrasound, accurate estimation of gestational age. Sonoembriology. Normal and abnormal appearances of the embryo anatomy. Biometry and embryo vitality. Ultrasound features of the most common pathologies in first trimester.
  5. Twin pregnancy, chorionicity and zygosity determination.
  6. Basic knowledge of ultrasound screening of fetal chromosomal anomalies (11-13+6 weeks of gestation).
  7. Fetal biometry – dating, assessing size and estimating fetal weight.
  8. Normal and abnormal appearances of the fetal anatomy. Common structural fetal abnormalities. Basic knowledge of intrauterine growth restriction.
  9. Ultrasound assessment of the placenta, amniotic fluid, umbilical cord and cervix. Key ultrasound features of common pathologies.
  10. Hands-on. Ultrasound scanning in I, II and III trimesters.

Lecturers:  

Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Liliana Fuior, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Attendance: 

22 participants, students (sixth year) and radiology residents of the State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemitanu”

Basic training course in gynecological ultrasonography.

Topics:

  1. Basic physics of the ultrasound. How the US image is generated. Limitations and common artifacts. The effects of ultrasound on human tissue and safety issues.
  2. Technical aspects and types of ultrasound examinations. Ultrasound applications in various fields.
  3. Basic functionality of the machine. Basic settings of the US machine. Image optimization.
  4. Image recognition of normal female pelvis anatomy.
  5. US assessment of the menstrual cycle (uterine and ovarian).
  6. Image recognition of common gynecological pathologies.
  7. Hands-on. Ultrasound examination of the female pelvis (abdominal approach).

Lecturers:  

Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Liliana Fuior, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Attendance: 

20 participants, students (VI year) and radiology residents of the State University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Nicolae Testemitanu”

The program:

13.00-13.30        History of Gastrointestinal Ultrasound (GIUS) and its place among modern imaging modalities, prof Harald Lutz,

13.30-14.10         New GIUS guidelines from EFSUMB and bowel scanning methodology,                                      prof Odd Helge Gilja,

14.10-14.40         GIUS, live demonstration (normal appearence),

14.40-15.00         Coffee-break

15.00-15.10        Samsung 5D Technology, a new standard in ultrasound. Chiran Denis-Mihail

15.10-15.40        Appendix, diverticuli. Appendicitis and diverticulitis, prof Dieter Nürnberg,

15.40-16.10        Inflamatory bowel disease, prof Ioan Sporea,

16.10-16.30        Complications in inflamatory bowel disease, prof Ioan Sporea, 20 min

16.30-16.50        Gastrointestinal emergencies, ileus and perforation, prof Dieter Nürnberg,

16.50-17.05        Transperineal ultrasound, prof Dieter Nürnberg,

17.05-17.35        Clinical cases,

17.35-18.00         GIUS, live demonstration (pathology),

18.00-18.20         Discussions

Lecturers:

prof Odd Helge Gilja (Bergen, Norway),

prof Dieter Nurnberg (Neuruppin, Germany),

prof Harald Lutz (Bayreuth, Germany),

prof Ioan Sporea (Timisoara, Romania)

The workshop was attended by 144 participants (sonographers, gastroenterologists, radiologists, fellows in training) from Moldova and Transnistria.

Abdominal ultrasound, from basic to advanced. 

Friday, 15 June, 15.00 – 17.00

Learning area

Basic theoretical course. Introduction in abdominal ultrasound examinations

  1. Course opening. Introduction and aims of the course. Ioan Sporea.
  2. Physics and technique – technical details at glance and setting up the machine – Sergiu Puiu
  3. Examination technique and Sonoanatomy of the Abdominal Cavity. Where to check for free fluid and gas? – Alina Popescu
  4. Examination of the liver. Liver segments, biliary tree, portal system and vessels

Hands-on Training: assessment of the liver and biliary system – Ioan Sporea

  1. Examination of the gall bladder, common bile duct – Mirela Danila

Hands-on Training: assessment of the gall bladder and bile duct

  1. Examination of the pancreas – Roxana Sirli

Hands-on Training: assessment of the pancreas and retroperitoneum

  1. Examination of the spleen and (abdominal) lymph nodes – Roxana Sirli

Hands-on Training: assessment of the spleen and (abdominal) lymph nodes

  1. First look at stomach and bowel – typical positions. – Ioan Sporea
  2. Examination of abdominal vessels – landmarks – Alina Popescu

Hands-on Training: assessment of abdominal vessels

  1. Basic pelvis and gynecology – Sergiu Puiu

Hands-on Training: assessment of pelvic organs

Saturday, 16 June, 09.00 – 13.00

Learning/Hands-on area

Pathology and special topics in abdominal ultrasound examinations

  1. Gall bladder pathology: Stones and tumours – Alina Popescu.
  2. Bile duct pathology: Causes of obstruction – Mirela Danila.
  3. Liver pathology. Diffuse changes – Ioan Sporea
  4. Liver pathology. Focal liver lesions – Mirela Danila.
  5. Pancreas pathology – focal lesions – Roxana Sirli
  6. Pancreas pathology – inflammatory changes – Alina Popescu.
  7. Pathology of gastrointestinal tract – Ioan Sporea.
  8. Tehnici interventionale in US – Ioan Sporea

Lecturers:

  • Course director:  prof. Ioan Sporea, Timisoara, Romania  
  • Faculty members:  Alina Popescu, Timisoara,
  • Romania Mirela Danila, Timisoara, Romania
  • Roxana Sirli, Timisoara, Romania
  • Sergiu Puiu, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova

Attendance 

30 participants, including 10 Timisoara gastroenterology residents, have attended the course

COE WEBSITE

You can follow this COE by visiting the site http://www.crdm.md or clicking on the title above.

COE MOLDOVA REPORTS

All WFUMB COE's are required to provide yearly activity reports:
MOLDOVA 2018 Report - click here >

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Sudan WFUMB COE

Sudan WFUMB COE

by Admin

The Sudanese Centre of Gastroenterology in Sudan opened in 2017.

ABOUT COE SUDAN

The COE Sudan is based at the WGO Khartoum Training Center in Khartoum, Sudan.

COE KENYA TEAM

The COE Team are led by -
Director: ELRAYAH MUSTAFA - View C.V here
Co-Director: SUZAN ELHAKIM - View C.V here

COE COURSES

Click on the dates and course titles below to view details ...

Critical Care Ultrasound Course.

Venue: Sudan Medical Specialization Board

Six International Conference On Mycetoma

Minatory Of Higher Education- Khartoum- Sudan

Annual GIT Ultrasound Course

Ibn Sina Hospital

Serial Activities for Post-graduate Radiologists

Police Hospital Khartoum

Musculoskletal Ultrasound For Rheumatology Post-graduates

Military Hospital -Omdurman

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